Input Please: National Promoters Meeting; October 20th, 2011; Adrian Sisters at Adrian Michigan


The periodic meeting of the peace and justice promoters for North America is being held this coming October 20th through the 23rd, 2011 at the Adrian Dominican Sisters, Adrian, Michigan.

Two years ago, on behalf of the Lay Fraternity of St. Dominic in the Western Province, a statement regarding key issues was forwarded.   This is the prior statement:

1.            That all public and private institutions at the state, national, and international levels seek and promote the legal protection of innocent human beings from conception to natural death from loss of life, liberty, or property without due process of law; and, relating to the dignity of each human being and based upon the concept that society may be properly protected from harm, that any person found guilty of any heinous crime should not suffer the death penalty.

2.            That grounded on the rule of law and the sovereignty of nations, persons immigrating to, or emigrating from, a nation should be treated with respect to, and in compliance with, the rights accorded such persons based upon the inherent dignity of each human being, together with rights established under law, including but not limited to natural, individual, family, religious, and civil rights.

The North American promoters are having a  meeting again this year, from Friday, October 19th, 2011 through Sunday, October 21, 2011 at the Adrian Dominican Sisters in Adrian, Michigan.   As the lay promoter for the Western Province, I am asking all lay members, councils, and chapters to gather and consider what issues you wish to have pressented to the national meeting this coming October.  

Please consider any key issues involving key religious issues that impact society and forward them if possible, by October 7th.   I will gather any comments from chapters, members, and councilors regarding any issue, summarize them, and it is my goal to personally deliver the summary to Adrian on October 20th as a member of the gathering.

Among the issues to be discussed at the promoters meeting according to their agenda are: “Climate Change, Education/Action for Nonviolence, Death Penalty, Disarmament, Iraq, Israel/Palestine, Trafficking, Immigration, and MDGs and the UN Agenda other issues that have emerged.”

In addition to the issues listed above, it would be good if the promoters considered additional issues more related to core religious principles of our Catholic Faith. Therefore, please pass along your chapter’s ideas etc. by Friday, October 7th, 2011, directly to the Lay promoter.  My email address is john((@))keenan.org.

Also, chapters should forward to me the name(s) of any person who serves as each individual chapter’s social justice contact person.  

Also, related to the subject of social justice, please take note that the Blessed Margaret Castello Chapter in Boise, Idaho is hosting a COLLOQUIUM on SOCIAL JUSTICE on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, October 5, 6, and 7, 2012 (yes, 2012). More information on the colloquium will be posted at a later date; but note your calendar for October, 2012.

Thank you.  Your friend in St. Dominic,

Mr. John Keenan, O.P., J.D., Lay Peace Promoter, Western Dominican Province

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Our Bishops Need to Preach Faith and Morals


In order to advance the Social Doctrine of the Catholic Church;

OUR PASTORS NEED TO PREACH FAITH & MORALS

and the Laity need to be Holy.

          On April 13, 2011, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops [hereinafter “USCCB” or “Bishops”] forwarded to members of Congress a letter [See here] noting that writing a federal budget demands “wise bipartisan leadership, clear priorities, and moral clarity.”   America’s financial house needs to be put in order, the USCCB noted, by “fulfilling the demands of justice and moral obligations to future generations; controlling future debt and deficits, and protecting the lives and dignity of those who are poor and vulnerable.”  

 The Bishops note three “moral criteria” regarding difficult budgetary decisions:  (a) that “every budget decision should be assessed by whether it protects or threatens human life and dignity; (2) that “the central moral measure of any budget proposal is how it affects ‘the least of these’”  (Matthew 25), including the those who hunger and are homeless, or who are without work or are in poverty; and, (3) that “government and other institutions have a shared responsibility to promote the common good of all, especially ordinary workers and families who struggle to live in dignity in difficult economic times.” 

 Calling life-affirming health care an “urgent national priority,” the Bishops throw great doubt on current proposals to convert entitlement programs such as Medicare or Medicaid to block grant programs or subsidies; and the Bishops called foreign aid an “essential tool to promote human life and dignity” and to enhance global security. 

 Pleading that the budget must reduce deficits and protect the poor, jobless, and vulnerable, the U.S. bishops call for “shared sacrifice by all, including raising adequate revenues, eliminating unnecessary military and other spending, and addressing the long-term costs of health insurance and retirements programs fairly.”   The Bishops declare themselves pastors and teachers, “not experts or partisans.”  Experts they are not.

 While the Bishops call for “priorities” in the national budget; their focus is wrong-headed.   It is agreed that the budget must be life-affirming, it must contain and reduce worldwide military adventures and commitments, it must provide a social safety net for the poor and vulnerable, it must tackle the monumental debt as an overarching generational moral issue; and it must control spending and entitlement programs.  However—for the USCCB—there is more to consider.

 In 2007, David Walker, Comptroller of the United States at the time, recalled that nearly 2000 years ago, the Roman Empire fell for three main reasons: [1] declining moral values and political civility at home, [2] an overconfident military in foreign lands, and [3] government fiscal irresponsibility.  

 As the old saying goes, nothing changes under the Sun.  Our modern American Republic is plagued by the same issues.   Whether Congress should expand or contract national spending, on what programs it should focus, and the degree of international spending is a prudent question to be answered within the constraints of the constitutional system of limited government framed by the American founding fathers.  That question is for the politicians.

 The real Gospel focus of the American bishops is not a call for governmental action, but the moral make-up of our country.   Every resource of the bishops should be focused on improving the mediocre catechetical teaching and preaching that occurs around the country, from the pulpits and in the classrooms, and call American Catholics to personal responsibility and to live a moral life. 

 While not universally true, many pastors fail to teach or preach, but often cite platitudes and generalities during the Homily at Holy Mass.   

 What is needed?  True preaching.  If the Bishops want to change the culture and touch the hearts of the American people that will ultimately guide the Congress, then preach

 In other words, the Bishop’s beseeching Congress regarding spending rings empty.  Why?  As teachers, the primary office of bishop is to teach the Faithful through effective formation of his priests and congregation.  The Bishops need to preach charity and morality from the pulpit with particularity.  In order to realize social change, the Bishops must engage the hearts and minds where it counts: at Church.  

 A converted heart motivated by love of God and the Gospel, will seek the necessary right action and moral change in their own lives and in their own families and communities.   It is the believers who are “doers” of the Word that change the World.

 Many of the social problems our Nation faces are a direct result of immoral conduct.   For example, the rising poverty rate among women and children is due to sexual conduct outside of marriage.    The federal Medicaid and supplementary security income budgets have exploded over the last decade.   Far too many unwed mothers find themselves with few choices and cornered in poverty.  Government rightly comes to the rescue to aid these mothers and children to uphold the human dignity of these vulnerable persons; but let’s not deny the immorality at play.  

 When unwed men and women act immorally and sleep with one another with utter disregard for other human lives, the children are born in poverty, the mothers are desperate, and too often the fathers abandon the family.  In the end, the taxpayer is called to fill the remaining monetary void.  It is a desperate problem that finds no immediately political solution; yet the focus of the Bishops should be on the right moral sexual conduct of the American people—especially Catholics.

 The Bishops need to preach.  Their priests need to be pastors.  The priests need to preach from the pulpit.   Part of the solution is concrete preaching calling people to improve their personal lives by ordered thinking, right action, personal responsibility, and moral conduct. 

 Preaching should encourage the Faithful to follow the Ten Commandments; to go to Mass; to engage only in marital sex; to uphold marriage as between a man and a woman; to encourage choices of life and family; to stay faithful to their spouses; to raise their children rightly; to not worry so much about activism but more about putting their own lives and families in order; to act charitably with family, neighbors, and other parishioners; to work hard, to pay their bills; to pay their taxes; to stay faithful to home and country; to give a day’s work for a day’s pay; to be honest and not to commit fraud or lying; to be good and effective students and teachers; to be fair and just business owners, bosses and managers, and on and on.   

 Admittedly, the USCCB has a role in national politics, but its call over the years for expanded government belies the reality that the quality and nature of preaching over the last generation has achieved a level of sustained mediocrity.  On many moral issues, until recently the Bishops have remained silent.  In order to pursue a more perfect society, they must engage moral Preaching.

 Calling the Faithful Catholics to live faithful, moral, responsible and good lives is the first step to changing society to live like Christ and focusing His people to act justly with charity.  Such a message will change the world.

 By Mr. John Keenan, O.P., J.D., promoter of peace & justice, Western Dominican Province; Blessed Margaret of Costello Chapter, Boise, Idaho.

 

The Plight of the Iraqi Christians


From Sr. Dusty Farnan, O.P. regarding the Iraqi Dominicans and Christians:

You might find the following video informative on the Christian situation in Iraq.  It was a PBS special in this past week.  [Sr.] Dusty

This section of the program gives a historical perspective on Iraqi Christians and an overview of current persecutions.  Many Iraqi Christians have had to flee their villages and/or their country because of the invasion by the United States.  As the anti-war song asks: “When will we ever learn?”

 http://www.pbs.org/wnet/religionandethics/episodes/july-23-2010/disappearing-christians-of-iraq/6701/

A Pretzel and The Absolute Right to Abortion.


The blog at First Things gets it right.  In modern America, abortion matters.  Often, it surpasses other rights.  After all, the act of an abortion grants an ugly spiritual power to certain groups in our society and  in the end, it “matters more than anything else.”     Our society is disordered and the logic is twisted into nonsense, when it permits the killing of kids in the womb and justifies it through politics.  In fact, lesser crimes like lying and cheating, and denying the rights of a parent become easy. 

For instance, as First Things reports in its blog about a 15 year-old pregnant girl that attends a public school and goes to the local school medical clinic.  In the case reported, the local school district cooperated with the minor’s abortion without a parent’s consent.  

Ironically, what if the pregnant youth, while being transported to the abortion office, had a headache and requests the school nurse for a pain reliever?    Imagine it for a moment, during transport, while attending the pregnant child, the school nurse calls the mother and asks permission to administer aspirin to the minor child?   That is required by law.  Yet, with great irony, the school nurse is not obligated to inform the mother or obtain the mother’s permission for the girl to commit an abortion.

This is absolute objective nonsense.   Yet, that is the state of the law in some states in America!   When human law abandons the concept that each and every human person has human dignity with the right to make choices and live in dignity, this is the kind of twisted mess that results. 

With further irony, what happens if the provider botches the abortion that requires immediate hospital treatment? The girl will be transported to the local hospital via ambulance and, guess what, absent an emergency the hospital would have to call a parent for permission to medically treat the child!  Also, regardless of what happens at the hospital, who is responsible for the hospital bills and ambulance?  The parents.

Only a pretzel could do better.

Socialism and the Catholic Church


 [From Deacon Bill Booth, Diocese of Boise:]

Lord John E.E.D. Acton (1834-1902) was quoted saying” … power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely. “I Another of his sayings is “Socialism means slavery.” Lord Acton was unusual person in Victorian England. For one, he was a Roman Catholic in Anglican country. He spoke up often about issues of his day.  Recently, I learned of a discussion between two people concerning socialism. One claimed to be an avid socialist and the other contended that socialism was opposed to the teachings of the Church. My curiosity was aroused to determine the truth of the matter.  First, what is the definition of Socialism? 

 1 : any of various economic and political theories advocating collective or governmental ownership and administration of the means of production and distribution of goods[;]

 2 a : a system of society or group living in which there is no private property b : a system or condition of society in which the means of production are owned and controlled by the state 3 : a stage of society in Marxist theory transitional between capitalism and communism and distinguished by unequal distribution of goods and pay according to work done.

 Pope Leo XIII published an Encyclical Letter on May 15, 1891, Rerum Novarum stating:

23. From all these conversations, it is perceived that the fundamental principle of Socialism which would make all possessions public property is to be utterly rejected because it injures the very ones whom it seeks to help, contravenes the natural rights of individual persons, and throws the functions of the State and public peace into confusion. Let it be regarded, therefore, as established that in seeking help for the masses this principle before all is to be considered as basic, namely, that private ownership must be preserved inviolate. With this understood, we shall explain whence the desired remedy is to be sought.

 Therefore the Catholic Church does not support Socialism. This issue is way too involved to cover in a short article. The United States has been a bastion of free enterprise for the rest of the world. Like every country in world history that has fallen, it is from within, not from with out. We are assailed within by those who would, as Lord Acton says, enslave us with socialism. The important to us as caring Catholic Christians, to be wary of outlawing of religion which is often the end result of socialism.

 Pope John Paul II, uses the phrase “to speak out”, against socialism when referring to Pope Leo’s Rerum Novarum. Can we do less?  If you are interested in this issue, the following reading list is a good place to start:

1. Rerum Novarum (On the condition of the working classes), Pope Leo XIII, May 15,1891.  The first statement of a Pope against socialism.

2. Quadragesimo Anno (On social Reconstruction), Pope Pius XI, May 15, 1931. Forty years after Rerum Novrum, a reaffirmation of Pope Leo’s statements and expansion covering Communism.

3. Centesimus Annus (On the Hundredth Anniversary), Pope John Pau II, May 1,1991.  Expansion on Rerum Novarum including the responsibility of the capitalistic system and profits to the good of all.

4. Economic Justice for All, National Conference of Catholic Bishops, November 18, 1986. Pastoral letter on Catholic Social Teaching and the U. S. economy.

 Deacon Bill Booth, Spiritual Director, Southern Idaho Cursillo

  1.  Letter to Anglican Bishop Mandell Creighton.

Editor-in-Chief, Gian Maria Vian, L’Osservatore Romano, The Vatican: “Obama is not a pro-abortion president.”


Dear Sir:

Your comments that appear in the American news service, Catholic News Agency, were sorrowful.  Unlike Europe’s gradual decline over the last several decades, America still believes in Christ and the Faith.  The culture war is upon us but the war for America’s soul is far from lost.  Your comments that confuse the Faithful is not helpful.  And the Faithful tire of this confusion from the Church.  As the editor in Chief of a grand newspaper,  you could have said something less than “Obama is not a pro-abortion president.”  You pointed out rightly that Mr. Obama approached the issue with some class, but Mr. Obama’s manner and demeanor does not diminish or eliminate his pro-abortion record as a prior state senator or U.S. senator.  Further his record since ascending the U.S. presidency is clearly pro-abortion.  He may want to dialog with respect, but the reality is that his positions are pro-abortion and his position leads to the death of the innocent. 

Your expression otherwise is a deep insult to any person who can simply observe the actions of others.  I am sorry to say, but in my opinion your absolute statement that Mr. Obama is not a pro-abortion president is good old-fashioned scandal and in some ways, treacherous.  The clerics and laity who have stepped up and tried to forge an articulate and respectable pro-life vanguard in America have been betrayed.  Your position on Mr. Obama is profoundly grieving to many Christians. 

http://www.catholicnewsagency.com/new.php?n=16034

Letter to Lay Members of the Order of Preachers regarding Peace & Justice Issues


[The actual final recommendations from the lay members of the Western Dominican Province to the North American Dominican Promoters of Peace & Justice are listed at the bottom of this post.]

 

John Keenan, O.P.L., J.D.

Lay Promoter

Peace & Justice, Care of Creation

Western Dominican Province

United States of America

 

April 16, 2009

 

Chapter Promoters, Peace & Justice Care of Creation

Lay Provincial Representatives

Western Dominican Province

 

            Re:       North American Peace & Justice Promoters meeting;

                        June 16-18, 2009

 

Dear Friends:

 

            Happy Easter!

 

            The Lay Provincial Council meeting is set for June 19-21, 2009.  The North American Dominican Promoters for Justice and Peace (NADPJP) meeting is for June 16-18, 2009 at Adrian, Michigan.  

 

            Please carefully review this letter.  Its purpose is to explain steps taken most recently regarding issues for the NADPJP, suggested issues, and asking for your Chapter’s suggestions for issues, comment, and input. 

 

1.      What happened.

 

In Sr. Farnan’s and Fr. Dahm’s letter of March 20, 2009, they said:

 

In April we will send out an official registration form for you and a tentative Agenda.  If you have any suggestions for the Agenda please email Chuck or I  [sic] and we will take this into consideration.  At Present we believe we need to address: Immigration, Nuclear Weapons, Middle East: Iraq and Palestine/Israel, Human Trafficking and Ecological issues.  We will try and use the framework of the Millennium Development Goals.”  (Underline mine).

 

With that request in mind, I drafted a letter and forwarded it to the Lay Provincial Council executive committee for their consideration.  I was given permission to forward the letter to Sr. Farnan and Fr. Dahm for their consideration. 

 

2.       The next step.

 

The earlier letter is not the final submission to Sr. Farnan and Fr. Dahm.  Therefore, please follow this procedure. 

a.       Peace & Justice chapter promoters and LPC representatives should review the issues listed below with your chapter and/or council.  

b.      Forward your comments and suggestions to me by no later than May 10, 2009 to my email address at john[at]keenan.org.  If you wish to discuss via the telephone, email me and give me a good time of day to call and your phone number.  I will call you back.

c.       These will be forwarded to the LPC Executive Committee for their review; after which they will be forwarded to Sr. Farnan and Fr. Dahm.  

d.      That letter will ask that they formally consider the issues of most concern to the lay members of the Western Dominican Province.

 

3.   Current NADPJP issues.  The 2006 Dominican Call to Justice document includes the following issues: (1) death penalty, (2) disarmament, (3) Iraq, (4) Israel/Palestine, (5) Africa, (6) Columbia, (7) Migration/Immigration, (8) Human Trafficking, (9) United Nations, and (10) Global warming.  You can see the details at the following website:

 

            http://www.domlife.org/DLC/Justice/JusticePage.htm

 

In addition, the referenced justice Dominican Leadership Conference online page lists other related issues, including the “new cosmology,” the “School of the Americas,” and “global warming.”  Many of these political and philosophical issues do not reflect key Church or moral teachings.  Further, these issues may be supported or opposed in good faith by different men and women of good will exercising prudent judgment.

 

The Church encourages us individually to be involved in cultural, social, and political associations with other persons of good will.  However, when we come together as Lay Dominicans, we belong to a province and an ecclesial institute of the Lay Fraternities of St. Dominic.  We do not belong to a political party.  There is a place for political issues and movements.  The Lay Fraternities is not that place.

 

Indeed, we belong to the Church which is a divine institution.  As Dominicans, we should responsibly review each social and political issue very carefully so that it reflects the moral order, conscience, issues and efforts so dear and close to the Church–not the whim of ideology and political ideas that benefit from currency or fancy.  The Vatican Council II amplifies this point when it states, “Laymen should also know that it is generally the function of their well-formed Christian conscience to see that the divine law is inscribed in the life of the earthly city….”  Guadiam et Spes, No. 43 (Emphasis mine).  See, On Social Justice Issues

 

Examples.  The Israel/Palestine conflict is a perennial issue, but there are two sides to the question.  Created under international law, Israel has a place in the world and the right to defend itself from aggression and terrorist attacks.  It also has the obligation to act in accord with the moral law and international law. 

 

            The Palestinians’ right to an independent nation-state should also be recognized.  It seems altogether, however, that many of the Dominicans at the national and international level promote only the Palestinian perspective.  This is very political.  Both sides of this issue, if reviewed carefully, articulate well their respective positions.  Probably both are true and both are exaggerated.  Nevertheless, the rights of both parties and people need to be recognized. 

 

Another example is the nation of Columbia. 

 

The United States has interfered with that country and promoted the war against the drug trade.  The Dominican Order has focused on that issue to the exclusion of other important issues that have occurred in Columbia.  While the drug trade and the drug war have harmed many innocent people, two years ago organizations of the United Nations and international pro-abortion groups successfully pressured Columbia and its supreme court to legalize abortion and “reproductive health” rights.  Where were the Dominicans on that issue?  You will not find that discussion on the domlife.org page. See, Dominican Life USA: Columbia

 

In addition, Dominican involvement at the United Nations is very important.  As a moral force, in addition to the issues it engages, you will see little, if any, Dominican involvement in ending abortion or focusing on the rights of the child in the womb as well as outside the womb. See, Dominicans at U.N.  

 

Fundamental to human liberty and to the pursuit of happiness, is the right to life.   As Dominicans, we are part of the moral vanguard, seeking and identifying, as we presently do, the numerous injustices in the world, but we also have the obligation to stand at the U.N.’s gates and remind them that if they cannot stand against the killing of the most innocent among us, then all their pronouncements and declarations are for naught.  This is especially true with the new American administration’s support for abortion ‘rights.’

 

Another example is “global warming.”  While many people state that the issue of man-caused global warming is fully and finally settled, and that we must take every measure necessary to change it, over the last two years, several world-renowned and honored scientists have come out against the concept of global warming, e.g. see these links, Michael Crichton, U.S. Senate Environment Committee: 650 scientists dissent man-made global warming theory, Global Warming Petition Project, 31,000 scientists reject Global Warming, NASA worldbook, and NASA scientist rejects theory.   The economic harm to the poor and underprivileged has not been seriously calculated if governments impose extreme anti-global warming measures, i.e. the cap in trade law.  See, here.

 

Another issue of concern is the Earth Charter.   The Earth Charter may be read at this link, Earth Charter in Action; and analyzed here, Catholic Family organization; and more deeply reviewed here, The Earth Charter.  Note also, the analysis on the Earth Charter was done last summer in prior correspondence to the LPC dated July 3, 2008.  To access, click here.

 

Finally, most importantly, what about protecting innocent human life?  From persons in the womb to disabled and older people, is quality of life the only measure of life?  As Dominicans, we need to stand as Christ did, as a contradiction to the world when protecting human life and in protecting institutions with historical and family significance.   If we want justice, we start with peace.   Abortion makes war on humankind and the world.

 

5.     Proposed changes and issues at the North American Dominican Promoters of Peace and Justice meeting, and why.

 

a.       A key change is simply procedural

 

First, discuss a procedure or organizational structure by which the peace & justice promoters expand representation of the sisters, friars, and lay people, and include a process that encourages a wide-based, grassroots consultation with all members of the Order regarding key issues.

 

b.     The following items are proposed for inclusion in this year’s list of issues according to the following order of priority:

 

1.    A call for a pro-life position consistent with the Church’s teaching relative to innocent human life from conception to natural death.

 

2.   A call to member governments, NGOS, and peoples from the United Nations to end the funding and advocacy of abortion or birth control.

 

3.  A call to the several states to pass and define the historical legal definition of marriage to be between one man and one woman.

 

4. A call to refocus the Order’s efforts toward a Christian-based anthropocentric environmental position.   Conservation programs must be based on good science, reasonable, moderate, and effective action, right and good order, and realistic solutions.

 

5.  A call to decrease excessive governmental intrusion and regulation in the health care marketplace. 

 

6.  A call to ease the tax burden on the American middle class.

 

The first few of these proposals consider the Church’s positions on key religious and social issues, including pro-life efforts, abortion, and marriage.  These concerns deserve a priority.  The “greatest destroyer of peace today is abortion.” [Mother Teresa, February 4, 1994’].  If the Dominican peace and justice movement is about true peace, then it should tackle the pro-life issue with a compelling priority.  Society desperately needs a softened heart.  If society cannot see an unborn person as innocent and defenseless, then are we—as Christians—doing any good elsewhere? 

 

The last two proposed issues are provided for several reasons. 

 

First, it is to propose differing, yet reasonable, points-of-view. There are men and women of good will who—in good faith—believe differently.  Some issues are debatable and should be thoroughly discussed before the Order endorses peace and justice initiatives.

 

Second, the Order of Preachers is not the proper forum for discussing many political issues.  Frankly, the better place for many initiatives is political and social institutions.   While the Church and ecclesial institutes may provide a proper moral guide, they should not engage in and make final decisions with regard to subjects where people of good will and good judgment differ on problems seeking effective solutions. 

 

For instance, some people have cited universal health care as a “right.”  While most people agree with such a sentiment initially, there are realities that need to be considered.

 

The first reality is that government-driven health care leads to long waiting periods and limited services.   Second, people want a choice.  Third, often times, when government intrudes, it creates more problems than solutions.  Is that not why this discussion should be held in a a political forum and not in an ecclesial one? 

 

Many people believe that human freedom is paramount to ending poverty worldwide, that the marketplace is best suited to provide the goods and services needed by people in the world.  Economic freedom enables men and women to protect and provide for themselves and their families.  Government is a partner in this effort, not the universal solution for social, economic, and other problems.  That is another example of why this discussion should deal with key issues involving our Faith. 

 

Conservation and the environment are legitimate issues and need focus.  On the other hand, where radical environmentalism acts with religious fervor, it places humankind below creation in the order of the cosmos.   In my home state, Idaho, this extreme position has closed forests to timber harvesting.   A dozen small Idaho towns have lost timber mills and tens of thousands of sustainable jobs that provide for workers and families.  Without conservation efforts to cull the forest and its undergrowth, the forest becomes fodder for intense and hot summer fires covering thousands of acres.

 

Third, there are solutions to social problems that need little, if any, government funding or action. 

 

As an example, the American middle class is the most charitable class of people the world has ever known.  

 

Following Christ’s admonition to provide charity for the poor and underprivileged, the American people give generously domestically and to foreign peoples when disaster and emergencies strike.   Rather than relying on taxpayer monies, in record amounts the American people readily give their personal time, energy, and intelligence, as well as money, to those in need.  If the American middle class is deprived of its wealth through excessive taxation, then many social justice and peace efforts around the world will be deprived of key capital. .

 

Finally, thank you for taking the time to read and study this letter.  Once I receive your Chapter’s contribution, I will present it to the LPC Executive Committee and forward them to the committee organizing the NADPJP set for June 16-18, 2009. 

  

Happy Easter.   

                                                                        Sincerely in St. Dominic,

 

 

                                                                       

                                                                        John Keenan, O.P.L., J.D.

 

———————————————————————————————-

 

These are the final and actual recommendations from the lay people of the Western Dominican Province forwarded to Sr. Durstyne Farnan, O.P., of the Adrian Congregation on June 17, 2009, for submission to the North American Dominican Promoters of Peace & Justice meeting:

 

*That all public and private institutions at the state, national, and international levels seek and promote the legal protection of innocent human beings from conception to natural death from loss of life, liberty, or property without due process of law; and, relating to the dignity of each human being and based upon the concept that society may be properly protected from harm, that any person found guilty of any heinous crime should not suffer the death penalty.

*That grounded on the rule of law and the sovereignty of nations, persons immigrating to, or emigrating from, a nation should be treated with respect to, and in compliance with, the rights accorded such persons based upon the inherent dignity of each human being, together with rights established under law, including but not limited to natural, individual, family, religious, and civil rights.